How to start and how to learn about cb750

JMartin

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Hi here from Edin (Scotland).

I am seriously thinking to buy a classic bike. Honda CB750
At the moment all my bikes have been from new or with a couple of years old.

So I have a few questions for you:
I want to use it frequently in a relaxed mode. What I mean it is not for collection and leave it static.

I discovered that there are a lot of different models. Where can I find the main differences between the models?

What I am looking is a good model to frequent relaxed rides and easy service.

I would like kick and electric start. And I don't know what else do I need to look forward?

Where do I start?

Thank you so much.
 
Welcome to the best choice you ever made...about motorcycles.
CB750K from 1972 to 1976 is the most common and so easiest to find parts for. These particular years have the most interchangeable parts of all the models. You can buy a rear wheel from a 72' and put it on a 76' and drive away. This is my recommendation for a new CB750 owner, to buy a K from those years.

CB750s come in K (standard), F (Supersport), A (Automatic/Hondamatic), and the extremely rare "P" or Police version. When we talk about "K4" we mean K model, 1974. Very easy like that.

Every single CB750 K, F, and P from 1969 to 1978 has a kickstart and a push button start. I know exactly diddly squat about the Hondamatics, but finding one of those isn't exactly easy anyway.

K and F are most common. The main difference between K and F models is style and braking. Supersports are designed to be a little quicker, but at this point, neither is going to fight with a 'Busa or a Ninja. All CB750s have 1 front disc brake, and rear drum brakes. F (supersport) have a rear disc, and some have double front disc brakes. They were the "crotchrocket" of the time I guess.

The CB750 is very approachable for a new owner, in terms of riding and maintenance. I went from a CB125 to a 750. It's a simple machine for the most part, gets more complicated as you move inward of course. To be honest, it's a great bike for feeling like you're good at wrenching, because it's so easy to work on.

There are a crap-ton of folks with CB750s, and a lot of online help if you want it. A lot of really friendly people here on this site for sure.

And I should mention that there are a lot of after-market and some performance parts around too. You don't just have to buy 45 year old parts on Ebay.
 
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You asked about riding frequently too. My first CB750 had 144,000 miles on the odometer. My brother rode past 100k and gave it to me at about 120k and I put 20k on it myself.

Yes. I love CB750s. I've had 8. No shame.
 
Welcome to the best choice you ever made...about motorcycles.
CB750K from 1972 to 1976 is the most common and so easiest to find parts for. These particular years have the most interchangeable parts of all the models. You can buy a rear wheel from a 72' and put it on a 76' and drive away. This is my recommendation for a new CB750 owner, to buy a K from those years.

CB750s come in K (standard), F (Supersport), A (Automatic/Hondamatic), and the extremely rare "P" or Police version. When we talk about "K4" we mean K model, 1974. Very easy like that.

Every single CB750 K, F, and P from 1969 to 1978 has a kickstart and a push button start. I know exactly diddly squat about the Hondamatics, but finding one of those isn't exactly easy anyway.

K and F are most common. The main difference between K and F models is style and braking. Supersports are designed to be a little quicker, but at this point, neither is going to fight with a 'Busa or a Ninja. All CB750s have 1 front disc brake, and rear drum brakes. F (supersport) have a rear disc, and some have double front disc brakes. They were the "crotchrocket" of the time I guess.

The CB750 is very approachable for a new owner, in terms of riding and maintenance. I went from a CB125 to a 750. It's a simple machine for the most part, gets more complicated as you move inward of course. To be honest, it's a great bike for feeling like you're good at wrenching, because it's so easy to work on.

There are a crap-ton of folks with CB750s, and a lot of online help if you want it. A lot of really friendly people here on this site for sure.

And I should mention that there are a lot of after-market and some performance parts around too. You don't just have to buy 45 year old parts on Ebay.

WOW thanks for the super answer. :)

I see on the market a few that there are not K or F they are CB750 Four. Are they K 1970-1978? Also I see that there are SOHC until 1978 and after that date DOHC. As far as I undertood SOHC is more simple to maintain and better in long terms.

I am quite exciting about this. I like more the classic look so I think at the moment I will focus in the model K until 1978.

Thank you so much for all that information it is very useful for my first steps in this nice new world.
 
CB750Four is all of the models, regardless of body type or model. The "Four" in the name just means that it's a four cylinder. In the 1970s there were CB350Fours, CB400four, CB550four, and the CB750Four. Typically when people say "CB750" they mean the K model, which were made from 69-78.

It's a bit confusing, but Honda kept using the name "CB750" for a couple decades, even when the engine changed completely. Like you said, DOHC. If you've ever seen a "Nighthawk" it's also considered a CB750.

I'm not an engine guy, but as for general motorcycle maintenance that most riders need to do, it doesn't matter if the engine is SOHC or DOHC. Older bikes tend to be easier for the rider to deal with normal things.

My best advice is to get one that runs and sounds like a normal, healthy vehicle. There's plenty of time to work on it later, no point in buying an old junker unless you just looooove wrenching. That's like... a whole different hobby than riding.
 
CB750Four is all of the models, regardless of body type or model. The "Four" in the name just means that it's a four cylinder. In the 1970s there were CB350Fours, CB400four, CB550four, and the CB750Four. Typically when people say "CB750" they mean the K model, which were made from 69-78.

It's a bit confusing, but Honda kept using the name "CB750" for a couple decades, even when the engine changed completely. Like you said, DOHC. If you've ever seen a "Nighthawk" it's also considered a CB750.

I'm not an engine guy, but as for general motorcycle maintenance that most riders need to do, it doesn't matter if the engine is SOHC or DOHC. Older bikes tend to be easier for the rider to deal with normal things.

My best advice is to get one that runs and sounds like a normal, healthy vehicle. There's plenty of time to work on it later, no point in buying an old junker unless you just looooove wrenching. That's like... a whole different hobby than riding.

Indeed I am looking for riding no for winter projects. In winter I hope just to do the service and that is all.

Thanks again for your help and time. It makes this much easier.
 
JMartin, in Edin there, about how much does an old CB750 run? I've heard that down further south, in England, prices for old bikes are pretty high. Same in Scotland?
 
Depends on their condition in the US. And the location. I've seen them cheaper in the northern states versus the southern states
 
Only sharing the differences here. Especially running versus not running. Cb750/900 not running is 1500. Running is 3500.
 
JMartin, in Edin there, about how much does an old CB750 run? I've heard that down further south, in England, prices for old bikes are pretty high. Same in Scotland?

Here there are more expensive but not too much they are still affordable.

You can find for 3000 pounds bikes that run but The bike is rusty .
For 4000 pounds you can find bikes working and far to be perfect in terms of aspect or have components non originals

If you something like new you need to prepare your pocket. 7 to 10k.

For 2k you can find winter projects.

I don't know if it is allowed put links so it is without links. My budget is 3 to 4k.
 
Here there are more expensive but not too much they are still affordable.

You can find for 3000 pounds bikes that run but The bike is rusty .
For 4000 pounds you can find bikes working and far to be perfect in terms of aspect or have components non originals

If you something like new you need to prepare your pocket. 7 to 10k.

For 2k you can find winter projects.

I don't know if it is allowed put links so it is without links. My budget is 3 to 4k.
here is a Japanese domestic market 1979 cb750fz based on the 900 european bike, just needs the correct paint job, too much work gone into it to explain without writing a book, over 1500£s in the mechanicals . if you are interested let me know
 

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I am start to research to import one from USA. Transport, logistics and taxes looks like less than 1000 pounds and the market is quite bigger. Any US website that sells classic Honda's cb750?
 
Just talking about buying old CB750K...

Prices are even worse than I expected. $4500 for a 70's CB750 that could use some "TLC"? $400 for a CB750 frame with wheels, some loose parts, but NO engine, no carbs...and no title??! No title is the deal-breaker of all deal breakers in my book. Frame is scrap metal without a title. (Application for "lost title" doesn't happen here unless the legal owner is present, and only if it was licensed in the last 10 years.)

$1600 for a 74' CB750K "project" with 72,000 miles on a K1 engine?! The only redeeming feature is that they say, "Engine isn't frozen up" and has a title. Doesn't run, paint trashed, seat and pipes are garbage, missing quite a few hard-to-find cosmetic parts, headlight and fenders are wrong...front end is wrong, and generally looks like hell. I know I have an "old guy" sense of value, but I reckon they want 4 times what it's worth. 3x if I'm making an attempt to be reasonable.

If the engine runs good once the carbs are cleaned, you'd still be into it for another grand for various shop supplies, necessary replacement parts, tires, and whatever missing bits you can get off Ebay. Could easily go much higher pretty fast if that engine isn't fit. Holy buckets.

Next project I'm going to have to shop in Antarctica to get a deal.
 
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