Cam Timing Chain Replacement / Crimping a Hyvo Chain

CBRiderNYC

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Hey All,

I've run into an issue with my top end rebuilt of my 1982 CB900F. I noticed that the timing chain was stretched out and one of the links was damaged. In short, it needs to be replaced. Not sure if I damaged it or if it was like this before I cracked open the engine. Either way it has to be done.

Here's the dilemma, to replace this chain it requires cracking the entire crank case open. However, as my name state's....I'm in NYC doing this work inside my apartment and I just don't have the room in my apartment to crack open the case entirely.

My solution has been to purchase a new cam chain with an open link. Using a chain breaker I have pushed one of the pins out of the old cam chain, attached the new cam chain to the old, and rotate the engine feeding the new chain into position. So far so good.....

All that left is to rivet / crimp the open link in the chain..........and this is where I am stuck. I can not find the proper tool to preform this job. I don't want to do this job without the proper tool and your average chain riveting tool is only set up to do hollow point pins not the flat nosed pins that the hyvo chain has. I want to do this job right because I know a poorly fitted cam chain can be a time bomb. So here are my questions.
  • Has anyone preformed this job before?
  • Where can I purchase the proper tool to crimp the pins on the Hyvo Chain?
  • What precautions should I take to ensure that the chain is secure and that is meets specs?
  • Am I asking for trouble doing the repair this way? If done correctly would a riveted / crimped chains be as durable as endless chain straight from the factory?
Thanks for the help,
CBRiderNYC
 

CBRiderNYC

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Here are some photos of the new chain for reference.
IMG_2339.JPEG
66477190515__AF2052DB-3577-4387-BED4-72966580AE48.jpeg
IMG_2340.JPEG
 

dirtdigger

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I never recommend to use master link chains. Too many things to go wrong if not done perfectly expecially for something so critical as the timing chain. Just my thoughts.
 

user8086

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Hey All,

I've run into an issue with my top end rebuilt of my 1982 CB900F. I noticed that the timing chain was stretched out and one of the links was damaged. In short, it needs to be replaced. Not sure if I damaged it or if it was like this before I cracked open the engine. Either way it has to be done.

Here's the dilemma, to replace this chain it requires cracking the entire crank case open. However, as my name state's....I'm in NYC doing this work inside my apartment and I just don't have the room in my apartment to crack open the case entirely.

My solution has been to purchase a new cam chain with an open link. Using a chain breaker I have pushed one of the pins out of the old cam chain, attached the new cam chain to the old, and rotate the engine feeding the new chain into position. So far so good.....

All that left is to rivet / crimp the open link in the chain..........and this is where I am stuck. I can not find the proper tool to preform this job. I don't want to do this job without the proper tool and your average chain riveting tool is only set up to do hollow point pins not the flat nosed pins that the hyvo chain has. I want to do this job right because I know a poorly fitted cam chain can be a time bomb. So here are my questions.
  • Has anyone preformed this job before?
  • Where can I purchase the proper tool to crimp the pins on the Hyvo Chain?
  • What precautions should I take to ensure that the chain is secure and that is meets specs?
  • Am I asking for trouble doing the repair this way? If done correctly would a riveted / crimped chains be as durable as endless chain straight from the factory?
Thanks for the help,
CBRiderNYC
I would not risk it... It's not really that much more work and I understand your situation..
But think of how much more work it will be if your mended chain comes loose..there's a reason you can't find a tool for it because it's not commonly done.
 

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CBRiderNYC

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I never recommend to use master link chains. Too many things to go wrong if not done perfectly expecially for something so critical as the timing chain. Just my thoughts.
Not technically a master link. A master link chain inside the engine would be a terrible idea indeed. This is a just a chain with an open link that needs to be crimp the open link.
 

CBRiderNYC

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I would not risk it... It's not really that much more work and I understand your situation..
But think of how much more work it will be if your mended chain comes loose..there's a reason you can't find a tool for it because it's not commonly done.
I ended up taking the engine to a shop and had a technician crimp the chain for me. Cracking the case is no small job but the main thing is I just don't have the space to do the work myself. I inspected the crimped links and measured them with my micrometer and they meet specs. The width of the crimped pin is sufficient and the width of the chain matches the other links. I'm going to track the measurements of the link pins after every oil change and If I see and deviations occurring. Its a risk, but the more I read it feels like a calculated one.

End the end I thought about it and a replacement engine is less than the labor would have been anyway.

Thanks for weighing in guys
 

user8086

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I meant master in terms of connecting the chain together.. as was mentioned in an earlier reply I do all my own work Good luck
 

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user8086

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CB 750f supersport
 

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CBRiderNYC

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Your bikes looking good, coming together. I'm jealous of that workshop, I've been working on the roof and inside of my 2BR NYC apt. Here's some shots of my engine coming together.


4.jpg5.jpg6.jpg7.jpg8.jpg
 

CBRiderNYC

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Shooting to have my bike back together in May.

1982 CB900f Super Sport when I bought it.

3.jpg


& after a little photoshop....

1.jpg


She's coming together nicely. Took it apart, set up a spray booth on the roof and painted the whole thing not just need the engine back and some wires.
 
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